topography Bowl | 1

r2p5s22_large-300x178

Topography Bowl | 1

topo1

topo1   topo2   topo3   topo4   topo5   topo6   topo7   topo8   topography9  topo10

American engineer and architect Buckminster Fuller designed his Dymaxion map of the world in order to present a non-distorted world-view of continents, a problem with other forms of mapping. The Dymaxion map is meant to be a flat, two-dimensional representation of the globe that once folded and its triangular elements reconnected, becomes a 3-D globular form. I decided to divide it in two and make a lidded container, with two similar objects at the level of form, while their respective surface remains distinct. It seemed an appropriate concept to investigate the design and fabrication of a ceramic object of such intricacy and complexity that it could only be conceived and produced using digital technologies.

topography Bowl | 2

topography1

Topography Bowl | 2

topo2

topo1   topo2   topo3   topo4   topo5   topo6   topo7   topo8   topography9  topo10

The original Dymaxion map was first digitized in order to transfer its graphic information to software, and to modify and transform it into either a double bowl or a lidded bowl form, subsequently. The 2-D map was given dimensionality by thickening what will become the wall of the ceramic form.

Various experiments with texture and dimensional topography were made in order to transfer the information found on the map to the bowls so that it would be perceptible both in a visual and in a tactile aspect, to stress its nature as a thing, as a ceramic object. The final solution concerning the dimensional topography for the surface came from a Mercator projection map of the world that was simplified into graphic forms representing various levels of the land masses as well as underwater elements, that could then be remapped onto the Dymaxion based 3-D designs. The map is seen here folded, given a thickness to create the walls of the object and divided into two forms that can then be presented as two independent bowls or connected as a lidded form that can be opened. The map of the world is continuous over the exterior of the lidded form, as it is continuous over its closed interior as well, and also continuous over each independent bowl, from their exterior to their interior, with a slight gap for the thickness of the wall at the lip.

topography Bowl | 3

topo2

Topography Bowl | 3

topo3

topo1   topo2   topo3   topo4   topo5   topo6   topo7   topo8   topography9  topo10

Digital printers have recently been modified to accommodate ceramic materials so that a virtual object can be printed digitally to produce a ceramic-based product that can then be fired in a kiln to acquire the specific properties of ceramic materials and ceramic objects.

topography Bowl | 4

Topography Bowl | 4

topo4

topo1   topo2   topo3   topo4   topo5   topo6   topo7   topo8   topography9  topo10

This experimental research is conducted by John Balistreri and Greg Pugh at Bowling Green University in the USA where this design was printed. The 3-D printer reinterprets the digital file as a series of stacked layers that are then “printed” one on top of the other. The powder in the printer is solidified layer by layer until the object is completed. The object(s) can then be released from the surrounding loose powder and fired in a kiln.

topography Bowl | 5

Topography Bowl | 5

topo5

topo1   topo2   topo3   topo4   topo5   topo6   topo7   topo8   topography9  topo10

A collage of photographic images that is digitally modified and morphed over the two objects in order to cover their interior and exterior aspects, over the topographic map of the world they already carry. These photos are used to cover the exterior of the lidded form, on the completed world globe, on one side (the “day” side), with a familiar and famous photograph from the Vietnam war, and on the other side (the “night” side), with a photograph of Paris Hilton. Both these photos were taken by photographer Nick Ut, on the very same day, June 8, one in 1972, the other in 2007, exactly 35 years apart. Coincidently, they also both show crying women, Kim Phuc Phan Thi and Paris Hilton, with hair in their faces. The interiors of each bowl will carry one the image of a burning Monk, Thich Quang Duc, taken by Malcolm Browne, also in Vietnam in the 1970’s, the other an unattributed view taken on 9/11 in New-York in 2001.

topography Bowl | 6

Topography Bowl | 6

topo6

topo1   topo2   topo3   topo4   topo5   topo6   topo7   topo8   topography9  topo10

In order to transfer the photos to the 3-D form, a distortion map has to be digitally produced, so that the unavoidable distortion is equally distributed all over the forms. This is shown here.

topography Bowl | 7

changeimage34-300x217

Topography Bowl | 7

topo7

topo1   topo2   topo3   topo4   topo5   topo6   topo7   topo8   topography9  topo10

Once the image is distorted correctly over the form, it can be digitally flattened again as a series of triangular shapes and printed with a digital 2D printer modified to operate with ceramic toners, so that the image can be transferred to the ceramic objects.

topography Bowl | 8

r2p5s32_large-300x216

Topography Bowl | 8

topo8

topo1   topo2   topo3   topo4   topo5   topo6   topo7   topo8   topography9  topo10

This is the first mapping of one of the images on the virtual form. By using these images and transferring them to objects that will be made in ceramics, these photos become permanently archived, a specific characteristic of ceramic materials and ceramic objects, exceptionally resistant to time.

topography bowl | 9

Topography Bowl | 9

topography9

topo1   topo2   topo3   topo4   topo5   topo6   topo7   topo8   topography9  topo10

American engineer and architect Buckminster Fuller designed his Dymaxion map of the world in order to present a non-distorted world-view of continents, a problem with other forms of mapping. The Dymaxion map is meant to be a flat, two-dimensional representation of the globe that once folded and its triangular elements reconnected, becomes a 3-D globular form. I decided to divide it in two and make a lidded container, with two similar objects at the level of form, while their respective surface remains distinct. It seemed an appropriate concept to investigate the design and fabrication of a ceramic object of such intricacy and complexity that it could only be conceived and produced using digital technologies.

topography bowl | 10

Topography Bowl | 10

topo10

topo1   topo2   topo3   topo4   topo5   topo6   topo7   topo8   topography9  topo10

American engineer and architect Buckminster Fuller designed his Dymaxion map of the world in order to present a non-distorted world-view of continents, a problem with other forms of mapping. The Dymaxion map is meant to be a flat, two-dimensional representation of the globe that once folded and its triangular elements reconnected, becomes a 3-D globular form. I decided to divide it in two and make a lidded container, with two similar objects at the level of form, while their respective surface remains distinct. It seemed an appropriate concept to investigate the design and fabrication of a ceramic object of such intricacy and complexity that it could only be conceived and produced using digital technologies.